Mindset by Carol Dweck (a Book Review)

Book: Mindset

Genre/Subject: Psychology, Growth.

Refereed From: The reading lists of Bill Gates and Tom Bilyeu.

Author: Carol S.Dweck
A renowned psychologist and researcher in the fields of personality, social psychology, and developmental psychology.

Brief Summary: The author delves deep into the science of growth and development, and provides accounts for the differences in the people who keep growing vs the ones who find it difficult to grow.

She is an advocate of the Growth Mindset, which banks on the belief that traits like intelligence and other skills are not fixed and can be molded and improved over time with good strategies and relentless effort.

Expanded Review:

This book presents a logical approach to the concept of growth in life. What I loved most about the book was how well researched the concepts were, and the scientific approach in analyzing and presenting the case studies.

The two broad categories that people are likely to fall in are: the fixed mindset and the growth mindset.

The author goes on to say that,”The view you adopt for yourself profoundly affects the way you lead your life.”

People in the fixed mindset are more likely to honor innate talents, they believe that our intelligence is fixed and doesn’t vary.

The people in the growth mindset believe in growing and getting better than the previous day, no matter what. The setbacks are a mere indicator of where one could improve.

Fixed mindset experiences:

We all have come across experiences when we have felt that we aren’t good enough and our intelligence is fixed. Such thoughts are common during harsh times, but it is far from the truth.

Another thought we may have is, since I did good in school, I need not work too hard at life. Good grades, good job, and a good life will come easy to me, without putting in a lot of work. Which doesn’t seem to be the case.

Noteworthy takeaways for cultivating a growth Mindset:

  1. Put in the required Work.
  2. Learn from both failures and wins, of yours and others.
  3. Know your strengths and limitations.
  4. ‘Improving Oneself’ > ‘Proving Oneself’.
  5. You have to put in the work in love/relationships too.
  6. Introverts with growth mindset do socialize (as they see the importance of it in their lives).
  7. Everyone is a blend of both Fixed and Growth Mindset.
  8. Don’t praise talent, praise honest effort and strategy of learning.
  9. People/children around you learn a lot from how you behave, work, and interact.

Growth Mindset in Sports:

The phenomenon of the growth mindset (incremental improvement) is reflected best in the world of sports.

She has introduced many celebrities in the field of sports, some of them are:

  1. Micheal Jordan (Basketball)
  2. Billy Beane and Babe Ruth (Baseball)
  3. Tiger Woods (Golf)
  4. Muhammad Ali (Boxing)
  5. Wilma Rudolph (Olympics)

She used these celebrities as examples to present her case, and breaks down the key growth minded elements that can make a difference.

True champions never took their present skill set as an indicator of who they could be, and nor did they take their victories for granted. They applied their minds to the sport, worked harder than anyone else, and played as a team.

“Becoming is better than being.”

‘1960s’ Saying

Growth Mindset in Studies/Career and children:

The author noted that the differences between the two mindsets can be clearly seen in the children from the way they respond to difficult puzzles and challenges. This is vastly influenced by the environment they grew up in, and the teaching of their parents and teachers.

In some studies, certain groups of children deemed unfit for learning made massive comebacks when they were guided by a growth minded teacher. They worked hard and went above and beyond of what anyone expected of them.

β€œPicture your brain forming new connections as you meet the challenge and learn. Keep on going.”

Carol S. Dweck, Mindset

The author discusses the mindset in big businesses and CEOs, and how leaders inspire global change. She covers the topics like parenting, social interactions, and relationships as well.

There is a lot more to what the book has to offer, I have only presented few points that just graze the surface. If you want to learn more about the Growth mindset, I highly encourage you to read the book.

Takeaways

If we believe we can, put in the work, and learn from the best, anyone can improve to become the best versions of themselves.


Ujjawal Sureka
A Student of life.

PS: If this post resonated with you, let me know in the comments, also share if you think it will be useful to others. Thank you, and have a great day.

All the images in this post are a courtesy of Pexels.com

11 thoughts on “Mindset by Carol Dweck (a Book Review)

  1. Uzzawal, is it about neuroplasticity? Sounds like a really interesting read. Always love a good recommendation! I’ll look into it for sure. Thanks friend! πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘β˜ΊοΈπŸ’œ

    Liked by 1 person

  2. “The setbacks are a mere indicator of where one could improve.” It’s a good way to think of things. That quote is really good about becoming. And this is a post for everyone! The importance of “growth” can never be understated. We focus too much on the physical aspect and in doing so forget of the mental and emotional/psychological one. Thanks for sharing. I’ll be checking out this book! Sounds like a worthwhile read, especially for writers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks a lot Radhika, I too share this curiosity for the human mind and our capabilities. I hope you enjoy the book when you read it. Have a good day πŸ™Œ

      Like

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